Lucerne Veterinary Hospital Blog

My Dog Ate My Stash: Marijuana Toxicity Revisited

marijuana

Glassy-eyed, stumbling, and afflicted with a sudden case of the munchies: while this may describe your neighbor’s teenage son, this is also becoming an increasingly accurate description of the family Golden Retriever. With the recently-approved referendum to legalize the use of recreational marijuana in the state of Maine, we may soon see a sharp rise in the incidence of marijuana toxicity. In states which have previously legalized marijuana, the number of accidental exposures by pets has greatly increased. In light of the increased availability of these potentially mind-altering drugs, we will revisit a previous blog post discussing what you need to know about the effects of marijuana in pets.

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posted in:  Pet Emergencies  |  Pet Health  |  Toxins

Poisons in our Pantries: Common household foods you didn’t know could harm your pet

Chart of poisons for dogs.

We all know that chocolate is toxic to our furry companions, but did you know that something as seemingly harmless as a raisin or even a stick of gum can be deadly? Read on to discover more household foods which, while are enjoyed by humans safely, may pose a real threat to our feline and canine companions.

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posted in:  Toxins

Emergency First Aid: What to do before arriving at the hospital

emergency

It can be quite distressing to witness your pet experiencing an emergency. The most important thing you can do is to bring your dog or cat to your veterinarian as soon as possible to maximize the chance of recovery. In this article, we will discuss some actions that you can take for certain situations before you are able to transport your pet to the hospital.

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posted in:  FIrst Aid  |  Pet Emergencies  |  Pet Injury Treatment  |  Toxins

Rodenticides: Deadly Not Just to Rats

rodenticides

Scruffy, a rambunctious two-year-old terrier, was at his summer cabin when he found a special treat under the cabinet—a tray of delicious green pellets. His family found the evidence later that evening, and monitored him over the next few days for any signs of illness. His stool was green for a day or two, but otherwise he seemed fine, and his owners breathed a sigh of relief. The following week, however, it was evident that something was seriously wrong. Scruffy started throwing up blood, developing dark diarrhea, and had difficulty breathing. At this point, he was rushed to the animal hospital, where tests showed severe clotting abnormalities. Fortunately, after several days of intensive care, Scruffy was eventually discharged.

Unfortunately, this is an all-too-common occurrence, and not all patients are so lucky. This story highlights the need to address rodenticide exposures as early as possible. There are several types of rat poisons on the market, and some may have delayed effects. It is vital to call your veterinarian as soon as possible so that decontamination and treatment measures can be initiated and the toxicity mitigated.

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